Select Page

People with allergies are more likely to develop FMS and people with FMS are more likely than not to have allergies.

Yeasts and parasites as a ‘cause’ of allergy

Infestation of the bowel by yeast or parasites can result in damage to the delicate lining of the intestinal tract as well as reduced health and efficiency of
the bowel flora. This can lead to substances (food breakdown products, toxins, etc.) being absorbed from the gut into the bloodstream, triggering allergic symptoms (often including fatigue and muscle pain)

In this way, the allergy and irritable bowel conditions can be seen as two links in a chain of events in which fatigue (a common side-effect of allergy) and muscle pain can also occur.

Exclusion and rotation diets

Food allergy can be dealt with by eliminating the allergen(s) through specific exclusion or hypoallergenic diets. The identification of foods to which we are allergic or intolerant can be difficult. In some cases it is obvious, and we therefore avoid the food; in other cases we may need to undertake long and
difficult detective work in order to identify culprits.

Notes for exclusion diets

Make notes of the answers to the following questions:

[twocol_one]

  • List any foods or drinks that you know disagree with you, or which produce allergic reactions (skin blotches, palpitations, feelings of exhaustion, agitation, or other symptoms)
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • List any food or beverage that you eat or drink at least once a day
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • List any foods or drink that if you were unable to obtain, would make you feel really deprived
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • List any food that you sometimes have a definite craving for
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • What sort of food or drink is it that you use for snacks? List these
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • Are there foods that you have begun to eat (or drink) more frequently/more of recently?
    NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • Read the following list of foods and highlight in one colour any that are eaten at least every day, and in another colour those that are eaten three or more times a week: bread (and other wheat products); milk; potato; tomato; fish; cane sugar or its products; breakfast food; sausages or preserved meat; cheese; coffee;

[/twocol_one]

[twocol_one_last]

rice; pork; peanuts; corn or its products; margarine; beetroot or beet sugar; tea; yogurt; soya products; beef; chicken; alcoholic drinks; cake; biscuits; oranges or other citrus fruits; eggs; chocolate; lamb; artificial sweeteners;
soft drinks; pasta.

Exclusion diet methods

  • Exclude from the diet the foods that appear most often on the list (in questions 1 to 6, and the ones highlighted in the first colour as being eaten daily). These are the foods to test (by exclusion) first – one by one.
  • Decide which foods on the list are the ones eaten most often (e.g. bread) and test wheat and other grains by excluding these from the diet for at least 3 weeks (wheat, barley, rye, oats and millet).
  • No benefit may be noted from this exclusion (if wheat or other grains have been causing allergic reactions) for at least a week, and you may even feel worse for that first week (caused by withdrawal symptoms).
  • If after a week symptoms (fatigue, palpitations, skin reactions, breathing difficulty, muscle or joint ache, feelings of agitation – or whatever) are improving, the exclusion should be maintained for several weeks before reintroducing the excluded foods – the challenge – to see whether symptoms return. [/twocol_one_last][hr]

[twocol_one]

  • If symptoms do return after eating a previously excluded food, this suggests that it would be better, for the time being at least, to avoid this food for a period.
  • Remove this from the diet (in this case grains – or wheat if that is the only grain tested) for at least 6 months before testing it again. By then
    the system may have become desensitized to it and be able to tolerate it again.
  • If nothing was proved by the wheat/grain exclusion, similar elimination periods on a diet

[/twocol_one] [twocol_one_last]

free of dairy  produce, or fish, or citrus, or soya products, etc. can also be attempted – using your questionnaire results as a guide – always
choosing the next most frequently listed food (or food family).

This method is often effective. Dairy products, for example, are among the commonest allergens in asthma and hay fever problems. A range of gluten free and dairy-free foods are now available from health stores which makes such elimination far easier.

[/twocol_one_last]

Bitnami